ExtraHyperActive: Backpacking
Showing posts with label Backpacking. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Backpacking. Show all posts

REI Co-op Quarter Dome Air Hammock For Hiking, Backpacking, & Camping

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REI Quarter Dome Air Review


If you loved REI's Quarter Dome tent, you'll love REI Co-op Quarter Dome Air Hammock !

A minimalist alternative to a tent, the REI Quarter Dome Air hammock packs light, sets up easy and provides a structured, open sleeping area up off the ground with a stowable bug net for protection.
This 1-person new backcountry hammock from REI combines elements of both tent and traditional hammock design.

Would You Pay $500 For A Camping Chair ?

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In theory, camping should be a very inexpensive activity since you are literally sleeping on the ground. But as with everything in modern day society, the simpler it appears the more expensive it actually is. Most people see the activity of loading up their SUV with a mountain of camping gear ( just so they'd spend a night or two in the woods ) as the highlight of their camping trip.

Plus, ( some ) camping gear nowadays is getting ridiculously expensive !

Like this carbon fiber camp chair from GCI Outdoor for merley ... $500 (!!!)

 GCI CF Lounger camp chair



ExtraHyperActive Bucket List : Hike Preikestolen ( Also Known As Pulpit Rock ) In Norway

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The Most Breathtaking Picture Of Preikestolen, also known as Pulpit Rock

Pulpit Rock, or Preikestolen in Norway  is the most famous tourist attraction in the Stavanger region. The mountain plateau hangs 604 meters above sea level, and a destination that simply must be experienced. You follow a well marked trail from the Preikestolen Fjellstue through different mountain landscapes. The plateau is approximately 25 x 25 metres, flat and you can enjoy a spectacular view of the Lysefjord and surrounding mountains !

I've added this hike/destination to my Bucket List ! Have you ?

Testing Ahnu Hiking/Backpacking Boots On Mt Si

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Mount Si, the monolith looming over Interstate 90 at North Bend, is Northwest icon, Washington state's most popular hiking trail, and the proven training ground for anybody getting ready to summit Mt Rainier.


But whether you dream of summiting Rainier, skiing Mt Adams, trad climbing Mt Shuksan, or hiking/backpacking the Wonderland Trail, Mt Si is the place to test yourself and your gear.

As I mentioned in my previous post, choosing a pair of good hiking boots can be the difference between a memorable experience and a miserable misadventure.

Recently, on a typical PNW winter day, I put my pair of Ahnu's Coburn hiking boots to a grueling test through dirt, mud, puddles and snow of Mt Si's 4-mile hike with about 3500 ft elevation gain.


Having summited both Rainier and Shuksan, and thru-hiked the 18 miles  Enchantments Traverse (aka the Death March), I knew exactly what I was looking for in hiking/backpacking boots.

Without getting too technical, I'll just focus on a few specs that were especially important to me :

Whether you are a hard core thru-hiker or a casual weekend warrior ( like me ), the Ahnu's Coburn hiking boots are light, breathable, waterproof, and will work great in all weather conditions and on any terrain.

My feet get easily cold. Keeping them dry and warm ( but not overheated ) is extremely important to me. After hiking for 3 hours in mud, puddles, and snow, at the end, my feet remained warm and (relatively) dry.

Leather boots tend to be on a heavy side. Same goes for synthetic ones once they get wet, adding weight and slowing you down. And we all know that a pound on the feet is like eight on your back. Even on the way back, the Coburn boots were as light as at the beginning of the hike.

Whether you are going on a leisure hike on a relatively flat trail, or  scrambling over piles of rock, the taller ankle height is a welcome feature for hikers who are looking for greater ankle support without having to upgrade to much bigger, stiffer, heavier boots.

Non-marking, slip resistant lugs provide the ultimate grip and traction. I was especially blown away by this feature ! In winter, the upper part of Mt Si's trail is (almost always) covered with snow requiring hikers to use either spikes or snowshoes. The boots' aggressive tread was amazing at gripping both wet rocks and snow. One of my knees is messed up, and I'm always concerned about slipping/sliding on the way down, even with extra effort (on my part) it was hard for me to make these boots slide.



All in all, the boots answered all the questions asked  when it comes to choosing a great pair of hiking/backpacking boots.

Now, the last question left unanswered - " How long will they last ? "



Hiking Lake Ingalls In Alpine Lakes Wilderness

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There are a few great hikes that go to Lake Ingalls. The 31 mile out and back, Ingalls Creek trail is one of the most strenuous, longest ( and loneliest ) in the whole Alpine Lake Wilderness. Few hikers complete the entire trail.
Lake Ann- Ingalls Peak loop is shorter ( 19 miles).

But even more hikers ( including me ) plan a short ( 10.8 miles round trip) and easy day hike straight to Lake Ingalls.

I hear that Lake Ingalls is a popular destination and draws crowds of people in summer time. Though, parking lot was full, we didn't meet too many people along the way or even by the lake.

A couple cool features of the trail :

Ingalls Pass is dotted with many great camping spots ( official with toilets and ...."less official" ).

Mountain goats roam around the lake as if they owe the place ( one particular goat struck a pose and practically told me : " It's time for you to go").

Ingalls Lake is beautiful, inviting and...freezingly cold. Yet, a few "brave" hikers reward themselves with a cool dip ( or a cold plunge ) in the lake.

If you happen to have "hiking fishing gear" among your "10 essentials" ( fish hooks, line and some artificial lures ), try your luck fishing for trout. Want to have more "fish fun" ? Try "trout tickling" :)

One piece of gear I would recommend - insect repellent.

For a guide book, check out Backpacking Washington's Alpine Lakes Wilderness