ExtraHyperActive: Camping
Showing posts with label Camping. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Camping. Show all posts

Romantic Camping

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Another Saint Valentine’s Day is coming , and many guys find themselves thinking up clever ways of how they are going... to avoid it. Guys are expected to buy jewelry (better be expensive), flowers, and top it off with a nice dinner. This year, instead of "the usual", why don't you try something different ?

Head into the great outdoors with your lovely counterpart this Valentine’s Day for some romance by the fire.

I know, I know, the terms ” great outdoors ” and “romance” rarely go hand-in-hand. But with just a few touches you can overcome this challenge:

If you’re really looking to connect as a couple with your paramour during the chilly months, slip on an "I Sew Naked Heart-Shaped Mitten" and invite your lover to join you in hot-handed bliss.




Tips On Camping In The Pacific Northwest

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Camping Hacks, Tips, and Tricks : When car camping, use a canopy along with your tent when it rains.



First when I saw these pictures, I thought it was pretty dumb. Why would anybody use a canopy along with a tent ?!
 
But this Memorial Day weekend when it was pouring cats and dogs in Washington, I wished I'd thought about that myself before going camping.

Adding a canopy will allow you to cook your food/BBQ, store additional camping gear, and "enjoy" the outdoors while being protected from the rain/wind.

It's portable and sturdy, quick, simple, and easy set up. And if you add a couple of "walls" and led lights, it will protect you from the elements in a myriad of settings and under almost any weather conditions, plus, you can continue your party way into the night.

Remember : The number one enemy of the camper in the PNW is neither bears nor bugs : it is RAIN !

So next time you'll go camping, bring along a canopy, like the one below. Trust me, you won't regret !


Have Trouble Sleeping ? Go Camping !

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Modern life disrupts our sleep through exposure to electric light and reduced access to sunlight.

For those who have trouble sleeping, researchers say that one week of camping, without electronics, resets our biological body clock and synchronizes our melatonin hormones with sunrise and sunset. ( this story was originally published by Inside Science News Service.)

Scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder found that if you live by the sun's schedule, you are more likely to go to bed at least an hour earlier, wake up an hour earlier, and be less groggy, because your internal clock and external reality are more in sync. The sun adjusts your clock to what may be its natural state, undoing the influence of light bulbs.

The disconnect between the outside environment and sleep is one reason why even native Alaskans have problems sleeping in the almost endless days of the Arctic summers, and get depressed during the long nights of winters.

And if camping isn't quite your cup of tea, the team suggests getting as much sunlight as feasibly possible, perhaps even starting your day off with a walk outside.

More Than Just A Sleeping Bag

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I've had my North Face sleeping bag for about 3 years now, and I'm still pretty happy with it. When I was shopping for a sleeping bag, I had no idea about temperature ratings, goose vs. synthetic fill, weight, shape...I just went with the cheapest I could find.

Sleeping bag technology has come a long way from the days of cowboy bedrolls. These days, there are a number of high-tech materials and designs available to keep you warm and comfortable during the coldest outings. But for some people these are not the only characteristics they are looking for....


ChumBuddy is 7 feet tall sleeping bag shaped as a shark, hand sewn and is filled with 30 pounds of soft fill designed " to make sharks more cuddly ". May be not practical, but might be a good present for one of your surfing buddies...

Hiking/Backpacking The Enchantments, WA :Take A Vertial Tour

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The Enchantments area of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness includes craggy peaks and ridges, deep glacial valleys, granite walls and forests that are picture perfect and ready to enchant visitors — especially in autumn.

Trips into the Enchantment Wilderness Area can range from overnight to multiple days. Due to the overwhelming popularity of this unique area, all overnight campers must obtain a permit if visiting from June 15 through October 15.

Rock Climbing, Camping, Water Sports, And Sightseeing At Vantage, WA

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Vantage is a small community in the Columbia River Gorge in the eastern portion of the Washington state. Though, the area is famous for its 25,000 seat concert venue and the annual Sasquatch Music Festival ( The Gorge Amphitheater is just minutes away from the climbing spot ), it's also one of the most popular rock climbing and outdoor destinations in the state of Washington.

The area referred to by its proper name, Frenchman Coulee is better known as Vantage among local climbing community ( due to its proximity to the town of the same name ).

This was my first time climbing and visiting the area, and I was absolutely blown away by its beauty and unusual ( for me ) hot weather !

Since it's not a climbing blog, I won't bore you with the description of climbing routes and levels of difficulty. I'll just say that even if you are a beginner climber, you'll find a route in your 5.6- 5.10 range. If it's your first time, there will be a lot of climbers who will be more than happy to show you where to start, and many guidebooks ( like Rock Climbing Washington) have detailed information about the area, driving directions, descriptions, ratings, route photos, topos, and recommended gear.

Visit Palouse Falls State Park In Winter

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Palouse Falls State Park is beautiful any time of the year but winter adds a unique touch as ice forms into amazing shapes and textures on the rock walls that surround the Falls...

Have you had a chance to visit this park yet ? I've seen amazing pictures of this jaw-dropping waterfall before, but once I was actually there... it wasn't that impressive.

Check out my experience visiting Visit Palouse Falls State Park last summer - "Driving Along The Palouse Scenic Byway To Palouse Falls State Park"




Explore Ape Caves At Mt. St Helens National Volcanic Monument

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At 8:32 Sunday morning, May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens erupted and blew down or scorched 230 square miles of forest. Shaken by an earthquake measuring 5.1 on the Richter scale, the north face of this tall symmetrical mountain collapsed in a massive rock debris avalanche. In a few moments this slab of rock and ice slammed into Spirit Lake, crossed a ridge 1,300 feet high, and roared 14 miles down the Toutle River.

The eruption is considered to be the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States
In 1982 the President and Congress created the 110,000-acre National Volcanic Monument for research, recreation, and education. Inside the Monument, the environment is left to respond naturally to the disturbance.

Visitor centers along highway 504 tell the story and provide stunning crater views. Trails let visitors explore the rebirth or access areas slower to recover.

Mount St Helens National Volcanic Monument is within the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Numerous viewpoints and miles of trails have been created for you to explore by car and foot. During the summer Forest Interpreters lead a wide range of activities, from short walks to amphitheater presentations, to help you understand and enjoy this area.

10 Adventures To Try In The San Juan Islands

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The Essential San Juan Islands Guide



I call the San Juan Islands - "Hawaii of the Pacific Northwest" !

The coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest, between mainland Washington and Vancouver Island, contain hundreds of islands, some little more than sandbars, others rising 3,000 feet. Among these, the San Juans are considered by many to be the loveliest.

The San Juan Island offer something for everyone. The islands are especially attractive to adventurers and outdoor enthusiasts.

We spent a few gorgeous early fall days, exploring the two of the most fun islands - Orcas and San Juan. Below, I offer a few suggestions if you plan to do more than just sitting on the beach and enjoying the sun :

Tips On Visiting The San Juan Islands

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The San Juan Island Archipelago consists of a staggering 172 islands, some only visible during extreme low tide, and well over 300 miles of shoreline. The three largest islands are geographically unique: Orcas being the hilliest, Lopez the flattest, and San Juan Island is a combination of both.

Though, there are a few bigger islands that are popular among see kayakers and boaters, the three big ones ( Orcas, Lopez, and San Juan ) are most visited by "leisure travelers" ( with Lopez Island being more popular among "recreational cyclists" ).

Below I want to share a few tips that I wish I new before visiting Orcas and San Juan Islands this September :

1 - When To Go

Any time !  There is no better time than island time !
Ideally, the best time to visit the islands is during summer : the views are simply amazing !
But summer time is also the busiest ( not to mention more expensive ! ). You can always travel during the week, but even that won't guarantee you short lines at the ferry terminal, or a camping spot on the same day.

That's why, for this particular destination, in my opinion, the best time to travel is either early fall or spring.
In Washington state, summer "extends" well into September/October : the weather is still warm, and the sun is still shinning ! Plus, it's less crowded, and the hotels and local businesses start charging "off-season" prices.

2 - Taking A Ferry To The Islands


The trip by a ferry is an adventure of its own !
The trip from Anacortes to San Juan island is about an hour long, with a few stops at Shaw, Lopez, and Orcas islands.
In summer time, the lines are long, and you're recommended to arrive to the terminal at least an hour before the departure time.In September we got on a ferry just 30 minutes before its departure.
Though in Anacortes you pay for round trip, if you want to travel from Orcas to San Juan, it will cost extra ~$20 ( round trip ).

3 - Take a car...or not

At some point I was debating whether to take a car or not. Since my son and I were camping for 3 days, and we had our bikes and a kayak with us, I had to take a car.
But some adventurous people do choose to take just a bike to explore the islands. This way, you can pitch a tent at one of many camping spots ( or even better, anywhere by the water ! for FREE ! ), or get a room at a hotel/resort.
Just keep in mind, Oracs Island is considered to be the largest, and the hilliest ( with Mount Constitution at almost exactly a half-mile elevation ). But you always have an option to rent one of the islands' cute scoot-cars from Susie's Mopeds.

4 - Where To Stay


The islands  offer you a whole world of choice when it comes to where you want to stay. Depending on your preferences you can choose from primitive camping to high priced hotels and resorts, or somewhere in between ( B&B's, cabins, bungalows ).
Since the islands are extremely popular, even prices for camping go as high as $25 + per night. Plus, reservations ( even for camping ! ) are recommended week(s) ahead.
But again, in early fall, we were lucky to get a camping spot right by the water on the same day !

Have You Visited Yellowstone National Park ?

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I had a great opportunity to visit Yellowstone NP during my road trip around US a couple years ago. Unfortunately, due to lack of time I didn't have a chance to explore this amazing park the way I wanted.

 I call Yellowstone NP " - "all American experience". And it's not only because it's one of the places in our country every American must see, it's also because it's very "convenient" to visit it. You can see/visit all major interest points/landmarks almost without leaving your car. Just drive to the next viewing point, get out of your car, walk a few steps, snap a few pictures, and you're done !

 Only for me, it's not the way to explore a new place. I want to immerse myself into the environment, and the best way to do it is through activities like hiking, backpacking, or camping.

 Next time, I plan to visit Yellowstone in winter ( everything looks better when covered with snow ), and to explore the park on skis or snowshoes.

 Meanwhile, check out this great video that will hopefully inspire you to make the trip to the park:

 

Long Beach Peninsula: surfing, biking, camping

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This was my first trip to the Long Beach Peninsula, and now, it has become my favorite coastal destination in our state. I found a whole lot more to do here than at other small coastal towns like Ocean Shores or Westport. It is a perfect vocation destination for families and outdoor enthusiasts.

My original plan was to check out local surfing scene here. Though, recognized as one of the longest and most drivable beaches in the United States, it's not that easy to find a good break. A few places I heard about are : Seaview , Klipsan Beach, and Leadbetter State Park. Surf conditions are the same as at Ocean Shores - small, foamy , but consistent waves. Dangerous rips are a hazard of surfing here, so I wouldn't go any deeper than waist high. If you are a beginner, a local area surf shop Skookum Surf Co. offers premium surf lessons, and surf gear rentals.


Since recently, on every trip I go, I take my bike with me. I found it to be easier, healthier, more fun ( and you save on gas ! ) to discover visiting area by bike.

One feature that completely blew my mind here was the Discovery Trail.

This 8.2 mile trail stretches from the northern city limits of Long Beach and goes all the way to Ilwaco ( a small fishermen town, also known as " Fishing Capital of the World " ). This is the best leisure biking trail I've ridden so far ! The trail is paved, relatively flat, and the scenery is amazing ( with the ocean just a few feet away ) !

Cape Disappointment State Park is the most visited park in the Washington State Parks system. The park's most famous and visited landmarks are two lighthouses ( North Head Lighthouse and Cape Disappointment Lighthouse ) and Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center. A Lighthouse Keepers Residence is now offered as a vacation rental through Cape Disappointment State Park. Fronted by the Pacific Ocean, the park offers breathtaking ocean views, great camping ( tent, RV and yurts ) and it's only minutes away from Long Beach. The park links a few short hikes ( I did Westwind Trail, which gets wet and muddy when it rains and really unpleasant to hike ).



All in all, I had a great first impression from this area. Besides the activities that I've listed, there is something to do for everybody : horseback riding, kiting, fishing, paddling, clamming ( something that I haven't tried yet :)...

The Long Beach Peninsula is remarkable for its continuous sand beaches and dotted with many small towns along the way, so if you can't find what you are looking for in one town, you can always just go to another one. Once in Seaview, stop by local Visitor Bureau ( Intersection of Highways 101 and 103 ) to get more detailed information.

Tips On Climbing Mt Adams

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Mount Adams, situated in the eastern Cascade range, east of Mount St Helens and north of Mount Hood, is the second most massive and the third tallest volcano in the Cascade range. Popular among hikers, backpackers, mountain bikers, skiers, and outdoor enthusiasts in general, Mt Adams is accessible year round, and visited by folks from both states - Washington and Oregon.


During summer, Mt Adams becomes a huge attraction to many "wannabe" mountaineers and ski bums. There are several climbing routes on the mountain, ranging from the "non-technical" South Climb, to highly technical routes that require advance skill, experience, and special equipment.

Because  the South Spur Route (aka South Climb, South Side, or South Rib), which initially follows the South Climb Trail #183 is crevasse-free, it provides one of the easier climbing routes and nicest ski runs on any of the northern Cascade volcanoes.

Recently, I spent 3 gorgeous days exploring the mountain, and below I'd like to share a few tips that I couldn't find answers for when I was researching my trip :


-  Driving


12 mile dirt road to the trailhead is a killer. Though I managed to get there in my Geo Metro, I highly recommend to drive something more "outdoorsy" ( like Subaru or Jeep ). On the way up, the road gets pretty narrow and sketchy. Exposed slopes make it hard and dangerous for two vehicles to pass by.

- Summer Crowds

As mentioned above, Mt Adams is very popular among hikers/climbers/skiers. During the weekend I was there, a ranger told me there were close to 300 people at the trailhead. Though when I made it to the trailhead, I could easily find a spot right by the trail.
Which brings me to another tip - don't waste your time talking to the rangers at the station in Trout Lake. Instead, talk to people who just came down from the mountain. They will be able to provide the most updated information.

- Camping At The Trailhead

Just like at Mt St Helens, you can camp right by the trail. If it does get overcrowded, you can always find space/parking/camping at the bottom of the dirt road or at Morrison Creek trailhead.

- Navigation/Trail Finding


I don't provide the description of the trail ( cause you can easily find it online ), but can definitely say its easy to follow the trail all the way to the top. So you don't have to have any special navigation/backcountry skills to climb Mt Adams....

...BUT

- Be Prepared

Weather on Mt Adams can change rapidly. Sudden snowstorms can occur above 6,000 feet elevation at any month of the year. Climbers should always prepare for bad weather and an extended stay on the mountain. I was blessed with two gorgeous sunny days on the mountain, when on the morning of my departure I woke up in pouring rain and complete whiteout.


- Stay Hydrated

Though I was told about a creek at Lunch Counter, I couldn't find one. I was glad I had my trusted JetBoil, and the old school "snow melting" was a breeze. If you would have to melt snow for a bigger group, you'd probably need a water filter as well.

- Gear

Crampons Or Micro-Spikes ? Ice axe Or Ski poles ? Rope ?

It was my second time trying out my basic ski mountaineering/ randonee gear ( skis with special bindings and skins ). I was concerned about the steep slopes, and wasn't sure I'd be able to skin up all the way to the top.
I ended up walking the majority of the route in my ski boots. But in reality, while crampons are highly recommended, you can use micro-spikes or a nice pair of hiking/mountaineering boots with aggressive treads.
You will need ice axe if you're planning chute glissading.
A rope can be very handy for a big group in case of a whiteout.

- To Ski Or Not To Ski


I was told Mt Adams was a great place for skiing in the summer. Honestly, it wasn't exactly what I experienced.
Late in the season ( I did it in late July ), a huge part of the mountain is snow free. And the portion from Lunch Counter to false summit ( (Piker's Peak) holds a consistent 25-30 degree pitch for over 2500 vertical ft. Which makes "skinning up" hard to impossible. So a big portion of the climb I did in my ski boots.

All in all, it was a great adventure ! Climbing/skiing Mt Adams has been on my Bucket List for a few years now. This post is another proof that goal setting is the way to make your dreams come true !

Urban camping

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In my opinion, traveling is not expensive, spending a night at a hotel ( even the cheapest one ) is. There is always an option to stay at a hostel or a camping site, but even there you will have to pay a small fee.

What if you could pitch your tent anywhere you want ? Like this car tent designed to look like a car cover



Well, of course, you'll have to pay those outrageous city parking fees :)

Here is another great idea from Belgian architects - a mobile multi-level tower that allows for tents to be pitched in urban settings.



Looks great, and I'm sure the view from the top tent is amazing ! Though a mid night bathroom trip might be a little inconvenient...

And the last option ? WallMart parking lots ! It was my home for 3 month last year living out of my Subaru...

Check out this video, it's pretty funny!

Testing Ahnu Hiking/Backpacking Boots On Mt Si

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Mount Si, the monolith looming over Interstate 90 at North Bend, is Northwest icon, Washington state's most popular hiking trail, and the proven training ground for anybody getting ready to summit Mt Rainier.


But whether you dream of summiting Rainier, skiing Mt Adams, trad climbing Mt Shuksan, or hiking/backpacking the Wonderland Trail, Mt Si is the place to test yourself and your gear.

As I mentioned in my previous post, choosing a pair of good hiking boots can be the difference between a memorable experience and a miserable misadventure.

Recently, on a typical PNW winter day, I put my pair of Ahnu's Coburn hiking boots to a grueling test through dirt, mud, puddles and snow of Mt Si's 4-mile hike with about 3500 ft elevation gain.


Having summited both Rainier and Shuksan, and thru-hiked the 18 miles  Enchantments Traverse (aka the Death March), I knew exactly what I was looking for in hiking/backpacking boots.

Without getting too technical, I'll just focus on a few specs that were especially important to me :

Whether you are a hard core thru-hiker or a casual weekend warrior ( like me ), the Ahnu's Coburn hiking boots are light, breathable, waterproof, and will work great in all weather conditions and on any terrain.

My feet get easily cold. Keeping them dry and warm ( but not overheated ) is extremely important to me. After hiking for 3 hours in mud, puddles, and snow, at the end, my feet remained warm and (relatively) dry.

Leather boots tend to be on a heavy side. Same goes for synthetic ones once they get wet, adding weight and slowing you down. And we all know that a pound on the feet is like eight on your back. Even on the way back, the Coburn boots were as light as at the beginning of the hike.

Whether you are going on a leisure hike on a relatively flat trail, or  scrambling over piles of rock, the taller ankle height is a welcome feature for hikers who are looking for greater ankle support without having to upgrade to much bigger, stiffer, heavier boots.

Non-marking, slip resistant lugs provide the ultimate grip and traction. I was especially blown away by this feature ! In winter, the upper part of Mt Si's trail is (almost always) covered with snow requiring hikers to use either spikes or snowshoes. The boots' aggressive tread was amazing at gripping both wet rocks and snow. One of my knees is messed up, and I'm always concerned about slipping/sliding on the way down, even with extra effort (on my part) it was hard for me to make these boots slide.



All in all, the boots answered all the questions asked  when it comes to choosing a great pair of hiking/backpacking boots.

Now, the last question left unanswered - " How long will they last ? "



Exploring Mt St Helens: Camping, Hiking, Caving And Enjoying The Last Days Of Summer

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Labor Day weekend means camping and cookouts for many families. We're no exception. It's become our family tradition to celebrate the official end of summer ( and that's exactly what Labor Day means to us ), with a long road trip to a far away place in search of a new and exciting adventure.


Just pitching a tent, roasting s'mores, and singing campfire songs don't work for us. We crave excitement, adventure, thrills, new experiences and lifelong unforgettable memories !

Last year, it was our first time trying "roughing it up"  a.k.a tent camping. I wanted to  make sure my 5 year old would be cozy and conformable sleeping ( almost) under the stars :) To make things more adventurous, we took a canoe across Little Kachess Lake.

But what could be more adventurous and mysterious than exploring a cave, learning about an exploded volcano, and going on a hike in a lava bed ?! Not to mention the usual camping, lake time, BBQ, and s'mores !

That's why this year, our destination was Mt St Helens area.

Though I've already explored Mt St Helens Ape Caves a few years ago, I couldn't wait to share the excitement of caving with my son !

We were very lucky to snatch a camp site right on the bank of the beautiful Yale Lake. Though the campground had a designated boat launch and a small beach, we had a privilege of swimming just a few steps away from our tent...which later turned out to be a bit ...uncomfortable...Apparently, our new family tradition was to say goodbye to summer by taking the last dip... at 7 am... in freezing morning water :)



Next day we took HWY 83 to Lava Canyon for a short hike. I couldn't believe how excited my son was walking on the rocks where lava flew just a few dozen years ago. He wanted to bring every stone as a souvenir back home.



But the highlight of the trip was, of course, exploring  the famous Ape Caves !




TIPS:

- If you're traveling with little ones ( 6-8 y.o ) make sure to bring warm clothes ( the cave stays cool/cold all year round )
- Bring water... though the lower cave ( the popular/touristy one ) is relatively short, it's still quite a walk for little kids, and they do get thirsty. 
- Don't skimp on little cheap flashlights... Besides the fact that you won't see much, pictures ( even with flash ) will be very low quality.

MOST IMPORTANT : There are two parts of Ape Caves - lower and upper caves.

While the lower part is relatively short, easy and accessible ( it's approximately is .75 miles long
and can be hiked down and back in an hour ), it takes up to 2-2 1/2 hours to finish the upper cave. You will climb over approximately 27 boulder piles and scale an 8-foot high lava fall !

Last time I was there, I promised myself if I would ever bring my kid here , he'd have to be at least 8 y.o and in a good fitness shape.

Many parents being unfit themselves, AND bringing along little kids, create a lot of traffic jams in upper caves, thus preventing other people from truly enjoying this unique experience.

DON'T BE AN IGNORANT PARENT, RAISING IGNORANT CHILDREN.
TEACH YOUR KIDS RESPECT OTHERS WHILE THEY'RE STILL YOUNG.


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Tips On Visiting Yosemite National Park

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Last summer I had an amazing opportunity to go on a road trip around Southwest. I had a privilege to visit Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and California. One of the goals of that road trip was to visit as many National Parks as possible.

Tip - If you're planning to visit multiple National Parks during your road trip, buy America the Beautiful National Parks Pass from REI.com ($80). It will save you money and time.

At one point, I was hesitating to  visit  Yosemite National Park, but stunning pictures like the one below changed my mind...


Also, it was quite convenient for me. Driving from Nevada/Arizona side, HWY 120 took me right through the heart of the park !

Tip - If you decide to drive to/around the park, choose off-peak hours ( before 9am, and after 7pm ). One line HWY is notorious for its traffic jams and slow driving.

Summer time is THE busiest! Quite often its hard to find an available camping spot. So, make your reservations ahead of time.

Tip - If you're ExtraHyperActive/dirtbag like me, you can pitch your tent anywhere you want, and in the morning, will be rewarded with the most amazing views !

Camping/Paddleboarding Tenaya Lake



Yosemite National Park offers an abundance of activities and sightseeing destinations. Among the most popular are : rock climbing and hiking.

Have you heard of solo climbing ? Solo climbing represents the ultimate extreme in rock-climbing. Solo climbing (or soloing) is a style of climbing in which the climber climbs alone, without somebody belaying him. What if he falls down, you ask ? He dies-- no two ways about it.

Alex Honnold has made Yosemite popular by scaling the two most popular Yosemite big walls — Half Dome and El Capitan.


Tip - I wouldn't recommend to sacrifice your life for a ( breath-taking, once in a life time ) shot like this, and would suggest to hire a guide. There is a popular wall just minutes away from Camp 4/ Yosemite Village.


Hiking

Yes, you can definitely opt for hiking Half Dome, but... can you really call it hiking ?


Tip -  If you have limited time for just one hike, make it Upper Yosemite Falls/Eagle Peak ! Why ?
Fewer crowds, and stunning view of Yosemite valley, and Half Dome !

Upper Yosemite Falls


On Top Of Eagle Peak


Fun fact : The setting sun illuminates one of the park’s lesser-known waterfalls so precisely that it resembles molten lava as it flows over the sheer granite face of the imposing El Capitan. A mid-February phenomenon!




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